Lactation Cookies (and Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies recipe)

Lactation Cookies (and Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies recipe)

Are lactation cookies all they're cracked up to be? Do I have to spend $4 or more on a lactation cookie to help my milk supply? And what the heck is brewer's yeast and why is it in my cookies?

I need to tell you guys something. There’s something that has been on my mind for a realllllly long time and it’s far past time for me to get it out there. I’ve been sitting on this for so long thinking it’s an unpopular opinion that’s not going to make me any friends, but I need to say it.

Here goes.

Lactation cookies are full of s***. 

Okay, phew. That wasn’t so bad. Now that it’s off my chest, I must admit, that my delivery may have been a tad dramatic. But bottom line? The evidence for lactation cookies is just not there.

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

So, if you’re unfamiliar, a lactation cookie is a cookie that is supposed to make your milk supply increase when breastfeeding. AKA – MAGIC! Which is why the concept of lactation cookies is so popular. (I guarantee 99% of moms or soon-to-be moms that breastfeed, breastfed, or plan to breastfeed have heard the term.) They typically contain ingredients that many claim boost milk supply, like oats, flax seed, and brewer’s yeast.

The lactation cookie craze has reached such heights that there are full businesses revolving around them! Businesses that charge $4 or more per cookie or bar, because they know a worried mom desperate to feed her baby will gladly fork over the money for a chance of increasing her supply.

Real talk for a minute? I get it. I’m sure you can tell by now that lactation cookies are a hot button topic for me. But when despite exclusively breastfeeding, my menstrual cycle randomly came back at 3 months postpartum (yay me!) and my supply totally tanked, you better believe I was googling lactation cookie recipes with the best of them. Even though I KNOW lactation cookies don’t have enough science-backed evidence and I would never recommend them to a client. Even though as a trained Certified Lactation Counselor, I KNOW a drop in supply coinciding with a menstrual cycle is common and likely temporary (spoiler alert: it was). But when you’re a mom (likely sleep-deprived) who just wants to feed her baby, sometimes rationale goes out the window.

That said – are lactation cookies safe? Typically, yes! And there is a bunch of anecdotal evidence of women saying lactation cookies have helped their supply. Unfortunately, scientific research at this point just doesn’t back it up. Do you know what research does support, though? That the mind is a very powerful tool. Sometimes just the act of doing something that you think may help (like eating a lactation cookie) is what eases anxiety and relaxes moms. Plus, cookies can be comforting. That reduction in stress helps her more than anything.

I did want to note, too, that if you are breastfeeding and concerned about your supply, please talk to a lactation expert or your pediatrician’s office. Even if you’re currently pregnant and concerned about your future supply, reach out now! A lot of moms are concerned about their supply when in actuality, baby is getting exactly what they need. And if you have legitimate concerns about your supply, focus instead on the number one evidence-based rule to increase supply: supply and demand. The more you breastfeed (or hand express or pump), the more milk your body will produce.

So, bottom line: if you want a cookie, eat a cookie. If you want to specifically eat cookies labeled lactation cookies, help yourself. And if you legitimately need help with breastfeeding or milk supply, get help – but turn to someone with a little more experience than a cookie. 😉

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

One last thing before I step off my soap box. A note to my fellow dietitian friends (I hope we’re still friends!). I’ve seen many dietitians creating lactation cookie recipes lately. I’ve seen a lot of dietitians requesting lactation cookie recipes for their clients. I just want to challenge you, though, to be cautious. Our profession is one based on evidence. While a lactation cookie likely won’t hurt our clients, current research says it likely won’t help them either. If you are a dietitian that would hesitate to put a “weight loss shake” or “weight loss soup”recipe on your site, I would encourage you to use that same hesitation when it comes to “lactation cookies”.

Okay, I’m breathing easier now! 😉 If you’re still here and still reading, I still want to be friends! In fact, I made you cookies as a thank you. To be clear: THESE ARE NOT LACTATION COOKIES. They’re cookies that I made with ingredients I always have on hand and they’re super delicious, satisfying, soft and chewy, and not too sweet. 🙂 Thank you guys for taking the time to read my thoughts. Sound off in the comments – I’d love to hear your thoughts on lactation cookies, too!

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

Yield: 20 cookies

Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies

15 minPrep Time:

10 minCook Time:

25 minTotal Time:

Save RecipeSave Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup blanched almond flour
  • 1 cup old fashioned oats (gluten free if need be)
  • 1/4 cup ground flax seed
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 2/3 cup chocolate chunks (or chips!)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper or silicon baking mats.
  2. In a stand mixer, mix wet ingredients (honey, coconut oil, vanilla, egg) for 1-2 minutes, or until thoroughly combined.
  3. On slow speed, mix in almond flour,, oats, flax seed, and baking soda.
  4. Stir in chocolate chunks.
  5. Place cookies on cookie sheets two inches apart. (I used a cookie dough scoop that holds two tablespoons of dough and got 20 cookies.)
  6. Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until outside of cookies are golden brown. The texture of the cookies will still be very soft.
  7. Can be stored in an airtight container on the counter for a few days, or frozen up to a couple months.
7.6.2
77
http://nutritiontofit.com/lactation-cookies/

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

2 Responses to Lactation Cookies (and Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies recipe)

  1. I enjoyed reading this post and I agree 100% I also went through the CLC training and they tell you during the training, that there is no evidence to back up that cookies, mother's milk, reglan ,fennel, will increase milk supply. I'm glad you wrote about Breastfeeding Myths. I just saw an article in Today's Dietitian written about BrF myths!
  2. Thanks, Kelly! I remember being so happy when they discussed that at CLC training! I'll have to check out the Today's Dietitian article - I'm glad myths like these are being addressed! It's definitely become a bit of a frustration for me when I'm seeing a lot of dietitians recently (who have no training in breastfeeding) posting recipes or round ups about lactation cookies. Even if you post a disclaimer saying "hey there's not a ton of research but it may help/ someone says they work!" -- that is absolutely no different than posting a recipe for "Pound Dropping Cabbage Soup" with a disclaimer that "hey, we don't see a lot of research (yet!) about cabbage soup and weight loss, but a lot of people swear by it!" So many dietitians would never dream of that and would consider it unethical - lactation cookies are no different. Okay, stepping off soap box again. ;)

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Lactation Cookies (and Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies recipe)

Lactation Cookies (and Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies recipe)

Are lactation cookies all they're cracked up to be? Do I have to spend $4 or more on a lactation cookie to help my milk supply? And what the heck is brewer's yeast and why is it in my cookies?

I need to tell you guys something. There’s something that has been on my mind for a realllllly long time and it’s far past time for me to get it out there. I’ve been sitting on this for so long thinking it’s an unpopular opinion that’s not going to make me any friends, but I need to say it.

Here goes.

Lactation cookies are full of s***. 

Okay, phew. That wasn’t so bad. Now that it’s off my chest, I must admit, that my delivery may have been a tad dramatic. But bottom line? The evidence for lactation cookies is just not there.

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

So, if you’re unfamiliar, a lactation cookie is a cookie that is supposed to make your milk supply increase when breastfeeding. AKA – MAGIC! Which is why the concept of lactation cookies is so popular. (I guarantee 99% of moms or soon-to-be moms that breastfeed, breastfed, or plan to breastfeed have heard the term.) They typically contain ingredients that many claim boost milk supply, like oats, flax seed, and brewer’s yeast.

The lactation cookie craze has reached such heights that there are full businesses revolving around them! Businesses that charge $4 or more per cookie or bar, because they know a worried mom desperate to feed her baby will gladly fork over the money for a chance of increasing her supply.

Real talk for a minute? I get it. I’m sure you can tell by now that lactation cookies are a hot button topic for me. But when despite exclusively breastfeeding, my menstrual cycle randomly came back at 3 months postpartum (yay me!) and my supply totally tanked, you better believe I was googling lactation cookie recipes with the best of them. Even though I KNOW lactation cookies don’t have enough science-backed evidence and I would never recommend them to a client. Even though as a trained Certified Lactation Counselor, I KNOW a drop in supply coinciding with a menstrual cycle is common and likely temporary (spoiler alert: it was). But when you’re a mom (likely sleep-deprived) who just wants to feed her baby, sometimes rationale goes out the window.

That said – are lactation cookies safe? Typically, yes! And there is a bunch of anecdotal evidence of women saying lactation cookies have helped their supply. Unfortunately, scientific research at this point just doesn’t back it up. Do you know what research does support, though? That the mind is a very powerful tool. Sometimes just the act of doing something that you think may help (like eating a lactation cookie) is what eases anxiety and relaxes moms. Plus, cookies can be comforting. That reduction in stress helps her more than anything.

I did want to note, too, that if you are breastfeeding and concerned about your supply, please talk to a lactation expert or your pediatrician’s office. Even if you’re currently pregnant and concerned about your future supply, reach out now! A lot of moms are concerned about their supply when in actuality, baby is getting exactly what they need. And if you have legitimate concerns about your supply, focus instead on the number one evidence-based rule to increase supply: supply and demand. The more you breastfeed (or hand express or pump), the more milk your body will produce.

So, bottom line: if you want a cookie, eat a cookie. If you want to specifically eat cookies labeled lactation cookies, help yourself. And if you legitimately need help with breastfeeding or milk supply, get help – but turn to someone with a little more experience than a cookie. 😉

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

One last thing before I step off my soap box. A note to my fellow dietitian friends (I hope we’re still friends!). I’ve seen many dietitians creating lactation cookie recipes lately. I’ve seen a lot of dietitians requesting lactation cookie recipes for their clients. I just want to challenge you, though, to be cautious. Our profession is one based on evidence. While a lactation cookie likely won’t hurt our clients, current research says it likely won’t help them either. If you are a dietitian that would hesitate to put a “weight loss shake” or “weight loss soup”recipe on your site, I would encourage you to use that same hesitation when it comes to “lactation cookies”.

Okay, I’m breathing easier now! 😉 If you’re still here and still reading, I still want to be friends! In fact, I made you cookies as a thank you. To be clear: THESE ARE NOT LACTATION COOKIES. They’re cookies that I made with ingredients I always have on hand and they’re super delicious, satisfying, soft and chewy, and not too sweet. 🙂 Thank you guys for taking the time to read my thoughts. Sound off in the comments – I’d love to hear your thoughts on lactation cookies, too!

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

Yield: 20 cookies

Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies

15 minPrep Time:

10 minCook Time:

25 minTotal Time:

Save RecipeSave Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup blanched almond flour
  • 1 cup old fashioned oats (gluten free if need be)
  • 1/4 cup ground flax seed
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 2/3 cup chocolate chunks (or chips!)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper or silicon baking mats.
  2. In a stand mixer, mix wet ingredients (honey, coconut oil, vanilla, egg) for 1-2 minutes, or until thoroughly combined.
  3. On slow speed, mix in almond flour,, oats, flax seed, and baking soda.
  4. Stir in chocolate chunks.
  5. Place cookies on cookie sheets two inches apart. (I used a cookie dough scoop that holds two tablespoons of dough and got 20 cookies.)
  6. Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until outside of cookies are golden brown. The texture of the cookies will still be very soft.
  7. Can be stored in an airtight container on the counter for a few days, or frozen up to a couple months.
7.6.2
77
http://nutritiontofit.com/lactation-cookies/

These Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are wholesome, gluten-free, dairy-free, soft and chewy cookies that are just subtly sweet. | Nutrition to Fit, easy recipe, easy cookies, almond flour cookie recipe, gluten free cookies, lactation cookies |

2 Responses to Lactation Cookies (and Almond Oat Chocolate Chunk Cookies recipe)

  1. I enjoyed reading this post and I agree 100% I also went through the CLC training and they tell you during the training, that there is no evidence to back up that cookies, mother's milk, reglan ,fennel, will increase milk supply. I'm glad you wrote about Breastfeeding Myths. I just saw an article in Today's Dietitian written about BrF myths!
  2. Thanks, Kelly! I remember being so happy when they discussed that at CLC training! I'll have to check out the Today's Dietitian article - I'm glad myths like these are being addressed! It's definitely become a bit of a frustration for me when I'm seeing a lot of dietitians recently (who have no training in breastfeeding) posting recipes or round ups about lactation cookies. Even if you post a disclaimer saying "hey there's not a ton of research but it may help/ someone says they work!" -- that is absolutely no different than posting a recipe for "Pound Dropping Cabbage Soup" with a disclaimer that "hey, we don't see a lot of research (yet!) about cabbage soup and weight loss, but a lot of people swear by it!" So many dietitians would never dream of that and would consider it unethical - lactation cookies are no different. Okay, stepping off soap box again. ;)

Leave a reply

There is no custom code to display.