Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard

Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard

Oatmeal is anything but boring in this delicious, decadent make-ahead Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard breakfast your kids will never know is healthy and packed with protein and fiber!

Edited 1/24/2018: please see recipe notes for instructions to make dairy-free and egg-free.

This Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard is creamy, sweet, delicious, but packed with fiber and protein for a well-rounded breakfast the whole family will love!

You guys. I’m not sure anything I write can give justice in describing how awesome this Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard is! It is just soooo creamy, comforting, and delicious. Like – when I was developing the recipe I thought it would be good, but boy it was even better than I thought!

This Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard is creamy, sweet, delicious, but packed with fiber and protein for a well-rounded breakfast the whole family will love!

The best thing about it, though, aside from the taste? It’s that it’s actually a more balanced breakfast than regular ol’ plain oatmeal. Gluten-free oats are blended with eggs, plain Greek yogurt, and fat free milk to amp up the protein and create the creamy, custard-like texture. Ground flax seed is included to up the natural nuttiness of the oats and add more fiber. Vanilla extract and maple syrup round out the ingredients to give a wholesome, comforting sweetness that brings the flavor to the next level. Everything is blended together, baked, and breakfast is born!

This Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard is creamy, sweet, delicious, but packed with fiber and protein for a well-rounded breakfast the whole family will love!

This is a great make-ahead breakfast for all my meal preppers out there, although the custard-like texture is best fresh. Since it’s a cozy vanilla, it’s great on its own, but also lends well to a variety of added flavors. Scoop out some Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard (warm or cold!) and top how you want. We love adding fruit, like fresh berries or banana slices, seeds (chia, pumpkin, sunflower, and hemp are awesome!), and a drizzle of milk – we used canned, light coconut milk to drizzle on top for even more creaminess. You can also add cinnamon, nutmeg, peanut butter, nuts – the options for toppings are only limited by your imagination!

This Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard is creamy, sweet, delicious, but packed with fiber and protein for a well-rounded breakfast the whole family will love!

I can’t wait for you guys to try this recipe. It’s totally a new favorite in my house, for breakfast, snacks, and dessert! Let me know what fun topping combinations you think would go well! If you try it, be sure to snap a pic and share what you think on the NTF Facebook Page or on Instagram (tag me @nutrition and the hashtag #nutritiontofit for everyone to see!)

Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard

Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Servings: 10
Calories: 177 kcal

Oatmeal is anything but boring in this delicious, decadent make-ahead Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard breakfast your kids will never know is healthy and packed with protein and fiber!

free from: wheat, soy, tree nuts, peanuts, fish, shellfih

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Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups skim milk
  • 1 cup plain, fat free Greek yogurt
  • 2 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 1/4 cup ground flax seed
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9x13-inch baking dish with nonstick spray.
  2. Blend all ingredients in a blender on medium speed until blended, about 30-60 seconds. (When you stop blending, the oats and the liquid may separate, and even be separated a bit in the baking dish - this is okay!)
  3. Pour blended oat mixture into prepared pan. Bake for 35-40 minutes, or until slightly golden brown and the center is firm and no longer jiggling.
  4. Can be served immediately, once cooled, or reheated. If there are leftovers, they can be saved in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 3-5 days.

Recipe Notes

You can use any type of milk or milk substitute (i.e. almond milk, coconut milk) you prefer.

Higher fat milks and yogurts may be used, but nutritional information will vary.

To make sure it's gluten-free, use certified gluten-free oats.

For a completely vegan, dairy-free, and egg-free version, omit the Greek yogurt and eggs and instead use a 14 oz package of firm tofu, then use any type of milk alternative you prefer. This option is very slightly less sweet, as it doesn't have the natural lactose sugar found in dairy, but it's an incredibly similar final product, and still delicious!

You can also try a plant-based Greek yogurt (made from soy, almond, coconut milk, etc.) and plant-based milk to make dairy free, and still use eggs, if that's an option you prefer.

Nutrition Facts
Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard
Amount Per Serving (0 g)
Calories 177 Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Fat 4g6%
Saturated Fat 0g0%
Cholesterol 67mg22%
Sodium 66mg3%
Potassium 282mg8%
Carbohydrates 24g8%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 11g12%
Protein 9g18%
Vitamin A 245IU5%
Calcium 152mg15%
Iron 1.2mg7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

This Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard is creamy, sweet, delicious, but packed with fiber and protein for a well-rounded breakfast the whole family will love!

34 Responses to Baked Vanilla Oatmeal Custard

    • I haven’t tested this recipe using steel cut outs, so I’m not sure if it will affect the cooking time or finished product in any way. If you try it, be sure to let me know how it goes!

    • Hi Elizabeth! I intentionally don’t list serving sizes because I work with my clients to honor their individual hunger and satiety cues, which means some days you may be hungrier than other days! Serving size should also depend on if you’re eating just this for breakfast or if you’re pairing it with something else, like fresh fruit and/ or a hard-boiled egg. It does make a 9×13-inch pan and my husband and I can usually each get several breakfasts from this pan throughout the week. Thank you!

    • Hi Sharon! I intentionally don’t list serving sizes because I work with my clients to honor their individual hunger and satiety cues, which means some days you may be hungrier than other days! Serving size should also depend on if you’re eating just this for breakfast or if you’re pairing it with something else, like fresh fruit and/ or a hard-boiled egg. It does make a 9×13-inch pan and my husband and I can usually each get several breakfasts from this pan throughout the week. I hope that helps. Thank you! Let me know if there are any specific kind of recipes you’d like to see in the future!

  1. Hi Lindsey! I just wanted to say that this looks amazing and I found it so refreshing to see someone not put serving sizes for that reason. Thank you! (I saw this recipe on Aldiโ€™s FB page and will definitely be looking at more of your recipes!!)

    • Thank you so much, Leesha, I really appreciate your comment, it means a lot!! Please let me know if there are any specific types of recipes you’re looking for, I am always working on new ones!

  2. Lindsey, I hope that you reconsider your policy on portion size and nutrition info! I’m a T1 insulin dependant diabetic, and while satiety cues are all well and good, unless I know how much insulin I need, I can’t really eat any of it. ๐Ÿ˜… Normally I can guess, but you’re using some ingredients that are known problem foods (maple syrup) and that I’m unfamiliar with (flax seeds.) I, and others with similar needs, would surely appreciate at least ballpark estimates!

    • Thank you so much for your feedback. I am constantly re-evaluating and this argument is definitely in my “pro” side for reconsidering listing nutrition info in the future. Thanks, Dana!

  3. Dana, You could add the recipe to a calorie calculator online and get the nutritional info if you need to track. It allows you to divide your portion sizes into what you want, ex: 1/8 of the recipe.

    I used this one https://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-calculator.asp. I love that it gives vitamin info too!

    Lindsey, Can’t wait to try this, I was looking for a way to add more protein to my oats for breakfast. Can I substitute the maple syrup for honey?

    • Fantastic suggestion, Carol! This is great, too, because you can customize it to the ingredients you’re using (i.e. skim vs. lowfat milk). With the addition of the eggs, Greek yogurt, and milk this definitely has more protein than your average bowl of oats! And I haven’t tested it, but I’m sure you could use honey instead of maple syrup (may just slightly alter the flavor – more honey flavor and less maple!). Thank you!

    • Hi Robin! I don’t know of anyone who has added brewers yeast (yet!), but let me know how it goes if you try it! While there isn’t a ton of evidence, many women also swear by flax and oats for helping lactation, so it may even help as is, too! (I’m also a Certified Lactation Counselor in addition to Registered Dietitian!)

  4. Mine turned out like baked eggs… Not what I thought it would be at all. I wonder if my blender is too powerful and just pulverized the oats? Anyone else have this problem?

    • Hi Kristine! I have a pretty powerful blender (a Vitamix) that always pulverizes the oats pretty well. Custards are an egg-based dish, though, and this channels that/ isn’t going to be like a regular baked oatmeal. Let me know what specific ingredients you used/ if you made any substitutions and I’ll try to see if I can troubleshoot for you. ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. I know I can substitute almond milk for the milk in this recipe, but any dairy-free suggestions for the yogurt? Plain DF yogurt is not available where I live.

    • Hi Bethany! I haven’t tested this recipe to be dairy-free yet (it’s on my list, though!). So far off the top of my head the only things I can think to try would be a dairy-free yogurt alternative or perhaps even a soft, silken tofu would work, too. It may be a little while, but I’ll be sure to update the recipe if and when I find a comparable dairy-free alternative! Let me know if you try anything that works, too! Thank you!

    • I used regular old-fashioned oats, but if all you have is quick oats, the result should be really similar (if not the same!)

    • Thank you Madison! I have not, but I believe a couple folks have made it with honey and had success! I would imagine most liquid sweeteners (maple syrup, honey, agave) would yield pretty similar results. Thanks!

  6. Hi Lindsey
    I love this recipe. I am very fond of egg custard. The thin layer of custard on top is my favorite. Any suggestions on how to have even more custard?
    Carol

    • Hi Carol! Thank you so much! I’m not sure off the top of my head. You could certainly try to increase the amount of wet ingredients (i.e. egg, milk, maybe a little yogurt), and may need to increase the cooking time, but I haven’t tested it, so I have no idea if it will work! If you play around with it, please let me know what you come up with!

    • Hi Melody – I recently changed recipe software systems and have been going back and manually updating nutrition information for each recipe in all my archives. As a one woman show with years of recipes, you can imagine this takes some time! As an apology for your inconvenience, I just updated the information for this recipe just as I saw your comment, so you can see the nutritional breakdown for each of the 10 servings in this recipe. Hope it helps, and hope you enjoy the recipe, it’s one of our favorites!

  7. Excited to try this – I found your recipe while searching for something Iโ€™m not sure exists: Pumpkin Oatmeal Custard. Going to add some canned pumpkin and pumpkin pie spice and see how it goes!

    • Too funny, Michelle, I was just thinking of trying to make a pumpkin version this weekend when I do some meal prep for next week! Let me know how it turns out! My guess is you may need a little less other wet ingredients since pumpkin is pretty wet, too? Maybe a little less milk or yogurt? Would love to hear how it turns out!

      • It was GREAT! I omitted one egg and one cup of milk, and added a teaspoon of pumpkin pie spice, and half of a large can of pumpkin (so about 14/15 oz.) Bake time was the same, and itโ€™s DELICIOUS. Looking forward to trying the original vanilla version too – I love custardy things, and this came together so quickly in the Vitamix!

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